Geyh, Patricia Keeney, et al. French-Canadian Sources: A Guide for Genealogists.

Orem, UT: Ancestry, 2002. 329p., hardcover. Index, illus, maps. $39.95. ISBN 1-931279-01-2.

Any guide to family history research in French Canada is automatically of interest to Louisiana genealogists not only because of the historical similarity between the French colonial systems in Quebec and Louisiana, but also because a large fraction of those expelled by the English from Acadia made their way to Quebec.

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Published in: on 18 March 2013 at 6:35 am  Leave a Comment  
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McManus, Stephen. Civil War Research Guide: A Guide for Researching Your Civil War Ancestor.

Mechanicsville, PA: Stackpole Books, 2003.

For many American genealogists, especially for those in the Southern states, and even more especially for relative beginners (i.e., those who haven’t worked back to the colonial era), a frequent early goal is either to identify an ancestor who fought in the Civil War, or to track down a known (or rumored) soldier ancestor of whom little is known other than the name and state of service. For many years, the best how-to book to assist in this quest was Bertram Groene’s Tracing Your Civil War Ancestor, but that’s gone for rather too long without an update, and there are have been number of major changes in research methods for this subject over the past two decades that must be addressed. (more…)

Published in: on 13 March 2013 at 5:52 am  Leave a Comment  
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Editors of Family Tree Magazine. The Family Tree Guide Book.

Cincinnati: Betterway Books, 2002. 336p., softcover. Index, illus, maps. $19.99. ISBN 1-55870-647-X.

I have to be suspicious of a book subtitled “Everything You Need to Know to Trace Your Genealogy Across North America,” because that’s patently untrue. The Introduction by Emily Anne Croom, “Getting Started Tracing Your Ancestors,” is well-written and touches all the methodological bases — documenting your sources, “clustering,” continuing education, etc. — but it’s simply not possible to compress a useful discussion of genealogical techniques into seven pages.

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Published in: on 14 August 2011 at 6:27 am  Comments (2)  

Mills, Elizabeth Shown. Evidence Explained: Citing History Sources from Artifacts to Cyberspace.

Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co, 2007. 885p. Hardcover, index, illus. $59.95. ISBN 0-8063-1806-6.

I admit it — when a new book is announced by Elizabeth Mills, I immediately put in an advance order, without even reading any reviews. I’ve heard her speak at dozens of conferences and seminars, local and national, and I’ve read (I think) all of her published articles. My regard for her professional expertise is such that anything she cares to say, I want to hear.

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Published in: on 4 August 2011 at 4:59 am  Leave a Comment  
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Mills, Elizabeth Shown. Evidence! Citation & Analysis for the Family Historian.

Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1997. 124p.; hardcover. $16.95. ISBN 0-8063-1543-1.

Every serious family researcher should be not only aware of, but thoroughly familiar with, the late Richard Lackey’s Cite Your Sources, which, on its publication in 1981, quickly became the Bible of genealogical source citation. Many, however, are not aware that Lackey was inspired by an article published a few years before by Elizabeth Mills — another name that all genealogists should be familiar with.

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Published in: on 27 July 2011 at 2:17 pm  Comments (1)  

Hoffman, Lee H. (ed.). Getting the Most Out of The Master Genealogist.

Baltimore: Gateway Press, 2003. 309p., softcover. Index, illus. $24.95 ISBN 0-9721567-0-4.

“Which genealogy software do you use?” is often the beginning of what might be characterized as almost a religious argument. Still, there aren’t many products on the market sufficiently complex to create demand for an after-market manual.

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Published in: on 22 July 2011 at 8:27 am  Leave a Comment  

Jones, Henry Z., Jr. Psychic Roots: Serendipity & Intuition in Genealogy.

 

CLASSIC REVIEW

 

Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co, 1993. 236p., softcover. Index, illus. $18.95. ISBN 0-8063-1388-7.

Hank Jones spent twenty years in movies, especially Disney films, and that freed him up later on to pursue his genealogical interests, both as an author and as a well-known national conference speaker — for both of which he received the NGS Award of Merit.

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Published in: on 14 July 2011 at 5:13 am  Leave a Comment  
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Boyer, Carl, III. Medieval English Ancestors of Certain Americans.

Santa Clarita, CA: Carl Boyer 3rd, 2001. 327p., hardcover. Index. $35.00 + $3.35 s/h. ISBN 0-936124-21-0. (PO Box 220333, Santa Clarita, CA 91322)

Boyer published the 3d edition of Ancestral Lines in 1981, and this volume, concentrating on medieval lineages of broad interest, is a further addition to that. He notes that publishing anything on medieval genealogy is perilous because errors are unavoidable, even among the experts.

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Published in: on 5 July 2011 at 9:43 am  Leave a Comment  

The Handybook for Genealogists, United States of America.

11th ed. Draper, UT: Everton Publishers, 2006. 862p., hardcover. Index, maps. $59.95. ISBN 1-932008-00-8.

For several decades, one of the first books a new (or newly serious) genealogist was likely to purchase has been “Everton’s Handybook.” It first appeared in 1947 with only a couple hundred pages of contact information, but it was an almost immediate success and the first ten editions have sold more than 1,000,000 copies.

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Published in: on 29 June 2011 at 1:14 pm  Leave a Comment  

Smith, Gordon Burns. History of the Georgia Militia, 1783–1861.

4v. Milledgeville, GA: Boyd Publishing, 2000–1. Hardcover. Index. ISBN 1-890307-32-7. (PO Box 367, Milledgeville, GA 31061 / <tignall@accucomm.net>)

There have traditionally been three schools of thought about the antebellum State militias in the South. Some historians have treated them as a joke, a haven for those who wanted only to carouse and get drunk. Others consider it as primarily an paranoid institution organized to enforce slavery. Most historians, however, have simply ignored the militia.

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Published in: on 22 June 2011 at 6:36 am  Comments (2)  
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