McManus, Stephen. Civil War Research Guide: A Guide for Researching Your Civil War Ancestor.

Mechanicsville, PA: Stackpole Books, 2003.

For many American genealogists, especially for those in the Southern states, and even more especially for relative beginners (i.e., those who haven’t worked back to the colonial era), a frequent early goal is either to identify an ancestor who fought in the Civil War, or to track down a known (or rumored) soldier ancestor of whom little is known other than the name and state of service. For many years, the best how-to book to assist in this quest was Bertram Groene’s Tracing Your Civil War Ancestor, but that’s gone for rather too long without an update, and there are have been number of major changes in research methods for this subject over the past two decades that must be addressed. (more…)

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Published in: on 13 March 2013 at 5:52 am  Leave a Comment  
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Mills, Elizabeth Shown. Evidence! Citation & Analysis for the Family Historian.

Baltimore, MD: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1997. 124p.; hardcover. $16.95. ISBN 0-8063-1543-1.

Every serious family researcher should be not only aware of, but thoroughly familiar with, the late Richard Lackey’s Cite Your Sources, which, on its publication in 1981, quickly became the Bible of genealogical source citation. Many, however, are not aware that Lackey was inspired by an article published a few years before by Elizabeth Mills — another name that all genealogists should be familiar with.

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Published in: on 27 July 2011 at 2:17 pm  Comments (1)  

Jones, Henry Z., Jr. Psychic Roots: Serendipity & Intuition in Genealogy.

 

CLASSIC REVIEW

 

Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co, 1993. 236p., softcover. Index, illus. $18.95. ISBN 0-8063-1388-7.

Hank Jones spent twenty years in movies, especially Disney films, and that freed him up later on to pursue his genealogical interests, both as an author and as a well-known national conference speaker — for both of which he received the NGS Award of Merit.

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Published in: on 14 July 2011 at 5:13 am  Leave a Comment  
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The Handybook for Genealogists, United States of America.

11th ed. Draper, UT: Everton Publishers, 2006. 862p., hardcover. Index, maps. $59.95. ISBN 1-932008-00-8.

For several decades, one of the first books a new (or newly serious) genealogist was likely to purchase has been “Everton’s Handybook.” It first appeared in 1947 with only a couple hundred pages of contact information, but it was an almost immediate success and the first ten editions have sold more than 1,000,000 copies.

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Published in: on 29 June 2011 at 1:14 pm  Leave a Comment  

Swan, James. The Librarian’s Guide to Genealogical Services and Research.

New York: Neal-Schuman Publishers, 2004. 361p., softcover. Index, illus. $75.00. ISBN 1-55570-491-3.

Working the reference desk in the Genealogy Department of a large public library can be an eye-opening experience. You have to know (or be able to identify) the principal resources for family research that might be very different from your own personal research, often involving regions of the country and ethnic groups with which you have limited experience. You have to be able to instruct beginners in the most basic concepts, often many times each day.

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Published in: on 12 June 2011 at 5:32 am  Leave a Comment  

Early, Joseph E., Jr. A Texas Baptist History Sourcebook.

Denton, TX: University of North Texas Press, 2004. 676p., hardcover. Index. $29.95. ISBN 1-57441-176-4.

Early is a professor of religion at Cumberland College and the author of two previous books on the history of the Baptist denomination in Texas. This one is meant as a complementary volume to Harry McBeth’s Texas Baptists: A Sesquicentennial History (1998), currently the standard historical survey.

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Published in: on 8 June 2011 at 5:17 am  Leave a Comment  
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Rubincam, Milton. Pitfalls in Genealogical Research.

Salt Lake City: Ancestry, 1987. 74p., softcover. Illus. $7.95. ISBN 0-916489-28-0.

Rubincam was one of the most popular genealogical speakers of the older generation of researchers, an expert in evidence analysis and methodology, and the chapters of this slender volume originated in talks he gave to national and regional groups, mostly in the 1950s. He takes the position that it’s possible for new family historians (or even experienced ones) to avoid most — though not all — research traps by learning from the experience of those who have gone before.

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Published in: on 10 May 2011 at 6:21 am  Leave a Comment  
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Rose, Christine. Courthouse Research for Family Historians: Your Guide to Genealogical Treasures.

San Jose, CA: CR Publications, 2004. 219p., softcover. Index, illus. $21.98. ISBN 0-929626-16-8.

Rose is a Fellow of the American Society of Genealogists and a well-known speaker at national conferences. She’s also an admitted courthouse junky. There are more than 3,000 courthouses in the United States and she’s poked around in more than 500 of them — and she would be the first to tell you that every one is different, even in neighboring counties formed at the same time. (I’ve spent considerable time in courthouses myself, though not as many as Christine. Maybe only 100.)

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Published in: on 5 November 2010 at 9:50 am  Leave a Comment  
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